Posts tagged marketing

Is modern Marketing more Science or Art?

It’s not a new question. It isn’t even restricted to marketing.  In times of austerity, with widespread cuts to public education and the ever increasing competitive job market for fresh graduates, the debate over the value of arts and humanities degrees vs. STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) degrees is a hot topic. You’ve also probably heard about how an individual’s personality is dependent on whether they are right-brain or left-brain dominant. The idea is that a right-brain dominant person is generally more emotional, creative and artsy while a left-brain dominant person is more logical, data-driven and scientific. While this idea has been shown to be a myth, the fact that it is such a commonly held notion is symptomatic of this dichotomy between art and science.

As with most debates, arguments and generally pretty much everything, it’s not all black and white. The modern marketer requires skills that fall into both areas of expertise in order to be successful. Marketing as a discipline can and usually does embrace ideas from both scientific subjects such as psychology, behavioral economics and neuroscience; as well as art disciplines such as design, typography and creative writing. (more…)

A Shocking Mobile & Social Media Landscape Difference in 4 Years

We all know mobile and social media has exploded recently, but have you seen any data studies that portray the impact on a global event like the Olympics? Check out this iProspect infographic on Mashable.

Olympics Mobile & Social Media Landscape 2012 by iProspect

Olympics Mobile & Social Media Landscape 2012 by iProspect

The Short 3 Hour Lifespan of Social Media Links

Bit.ly: Lifespan of Links in Social Media. Distribution of half-lifes over four different referrer types. Facebook, twitter and direct link (links shared via email, instant messengers etc.) half lifes follow a strikingly similar distribution.

Distribution of half-lifes over four different referrer types. via Bit.ly

There is a lot of noise on social networks these days with real friends’ updates getting lost in the chaotic streams of advertising and social media marketing. This is great for businesses but quite annoying as a friend.

Research at bit.ly analyzed a 1000 popular links to find: ‘In general, half life of a bitly link is about 3 hours, unless you publish your links on youtube, where you can expect about 7 hours worth of attention. Many links last a lot less than 2 hours; other more sticky links last longer than 11 hours over all the referrers. This leads us to believe that the lifespan of your link is connected more to what content it points to than on where you post it: on the social web it’s all about what you share, not where you share it!’.

So popular links live around 3 hours with an initial burst of attention within the first 30-90 minutes which slowly fades away while other links lose interest within minutes!

Why Text Message Marketing isn’t Aging

While you can reach out to large audiences through social marketing, you shouldn’t overlook the importance of sending tailored content targeted at a select audience. Engaging and conversions, When your pitch to the consumers is meets their desires, you’re far more likely to drive engagement and conversions.

According to this study by Mashable, Mogreet has found ‘84% of Facebook news feed stories aren’t viewed, 71% of tweets get ignored and 88% of emails go unopened. Meanwhile, 98% of text messages are opened, and therefore, companies that market through SMS/MMS have a far truer reach.’

Text Message Marketing - Narrowcasting by Mogreet via Mashable

Text Message Marketing – Narrowcasting by Mogreet via Mashable

Google PPC’s Strategic War on Free Clicks

Google’s main revenue source is advertising and it only makes sense for them to bury organic search results under paid advertising. A recent study carried out by Wordstream found “Clicks on paid search listings beat out organic clicks by nearly a 2:1 margin for keywords with high commercial intent in the US.”

Does this mean the end is near for business SEO?

Google Ads and the War on Free Clicks. via Wordstream

Google Ads and the War on Free Clicks. via Wordstream

‘Growth Hacker is the new VP Marketing’ via Andrew Chen

Traditional mass marketing is dying. There is a new breed of badass marketers coming up in the world; these guys are a mix between marketing and engineering. Conventional marketing campaigns take time to yield results, while engineering an experience built for growth or engagement is newer, faster and the future of marketing. Growth hackers manage to leverage ‘superplatforms’ and acquire millions of users within an extraordinarily short time.

These guys understand and see past technical capabilities and limitations. For them there are no dead ends, but exciting opportunities to get their hands dirty to start making, coding, hacking and delivering. When these guys integrate user experience, analytics and a viral marketing mechanism within the use of the product itself they expose their product to millions of users. Andrew Chen’s article supports this growth hacking revolution by an impressive case study of Airbnb and a Craigslist hack integration.

The Craigslist integration for Airbnb is geniusly integrated into the user flow, a simple bridge between the old and new way of finding a place to stay. Integrating a bridge between the old (your potential users) and your new service within a user’s flow, creates a viral engine of growth that operates every time your service is used.

How do you become a growth hacker? Read Andrew Chan’s follow up post here.

Exposing your service to these superplatforms is the key to quickly increasing your reach. But how did these superplatforms grow themselves? Contact importing was a key contributor. The most successful and fastest growing social networks in the world leveraged the superplatforms of their era – email contact lists.

A main acquisition priority is getting existing users to send invitations and referrals by enabling them to import their contacts then collecting, analyzing and tweaking each stage/action of the invited user until they sign up. A member of the Facebook growth team, Andy Johns, provided some valuable insight to the strategies they used over on Quora: Facebook Growth & Traction: What are some decisions taken by the “Growth team” at Facebook that helped Facebook reach 500 million users?. Another interesting answer by Andy summarizes the core expertise behind the growth team’s approach to the challenge, 1 billion or more active monthly users.

Finally a useful list of some great strategies recommended by Andy Johns for conversion optimization, also on Quora. Grow much and prosper. ;p

Viral Marketing: Integrating NFC tech with Social Media

I believe in a bright future of integration of NFC technology with social media marketing by bridging the gap between the offline and online world. First give your flock incentives to allow social privileges to an NFC device. Next, have them tap this NFC device to gain access to events, products, services, features or functions instead of using tickets, vouchers, coupons and IDs. Every time they tap for access, the system will write to their social circles, and if you get creative by adding a live photo booth, video or other catchy creative/feature – their network will start interacting with that media. It’ll definitely add to the feed chaos, but your presence will spread virally, and unfortunately, that’s what matters at the moment. Check out the examples and links below.

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Apple’s Advertising Style Copied

French Fry a la Apple Ad Style via Gizmodo

French Fry a la Apple Ad Style via Gizmodo

This hilarious post on Gizmodo showcases the dangers of copying, and how minimalist Apple’s ads really are. It brings Pablo Picasso’s quote on copying to mind, “Good artists copy, great artists steal”. If you don’t understand the inspiration behind the development of the concept, then you won’t be able to incorporate a fresh perspective that portrays the original essence along with its newly adapted meaning. Check out the rest of the ads (more…)

Mirror, mirror. An extraordinary pervasive AI computing UX vision. – The New York Times, Nieman Journalism Lab

Every once in a while something extraordinary comes along in gadgets. If you’ve got a little pervasive AI computing vision, the possibilites are endless!

Lets say Herbert, your mairror, (ai mirror duh?!), is installed on all your mirrors (bedroom, bathroom, entrance lounge) and displays (tv, lcd, phone, watch, kitchen).

It syncs with your calender, to do list, your news of interest, monitors your health, delivers media status updates from your closest friends and family, reads out important sms/emails/media notes, orders groceries, cleaning services, finds/delivers hints/tips/updates on your hobbies/wishlist, and encourages you to find time for those things you always wanted to learn but never find time to (even reads to you, teaches you interactively), and monitors your progress and gives you feedback. Whatever you want, nothing else. 

Yes, there are many possible risks, fine details that need to be tweaked here, but I’m overlooking that for now and looking at just these few scenarios I thought up of in a minute. The potentials of a truly invisible interface here is amazing and there are a blahzillion enhancement paths for every field of science, living and business. 

This is the start of true pervasive computing, where you’re listening to the radio in your car, like the artist/song, trigger some kind of action word/button, and Herbert finds and books you their next concert, or signs up for email newsletters for itself to one day tell/show you in the future while you’re brushing your teeth. Heck, even the annoying radio guy can be muted and Herbert can fill you in on whats important to you. Maybe even keep in touch with Pedro, your brothers mairror and arrange a call when you’re both free.  

Read on to see how far this prototype has come to date: Mirror, mirror: The New York Times wants to serve you info as you’re brushing your teeth » Nieman Journalism Lab.

UX: Effectively triggering emotional responses with smiles and faces.

Results of an A/B testing evaluation show how triggering an emotional response / connection from user’s vastly increases their response rate, by 102.5% in this case. This seems to have the marketing power of testimonials, but portrayed in one happy smiling customer photo. A picture is worth a thousand wordsBehind the scenes: A/B testing part 3: Finalé – 37signals.

37signals.com - A/B Testing Person Design

37signals.com - A/B Testing Person Design

Results of eye-tracking studies have shown how you can grab and guide a user’s eye using a similar emotional response. You look where they look, people look at other people’s faces – UsableWorld.com.au. But just because their eyes have seen an element on a page, doesn’ t mean that they’ve registered it.

Tobii eye tracker heat map of 106 viewing baby ad - UsableWorld.com.au

Tobii eye tracker heat map of 106 viewing baby ad - UsableWorld.com.au

Further reading:

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